In Other News

Anthem’s exit leaves thousands without health insurance choice in California

By Ana B. Ibarra California Healthline|

Often missing in the repeal-and-replace health care debate: The voices of women

Women, in particular, have a lot at stake in the fight over the future of health care. Not only do many depend on insurance coverage for maternity care and contraception, they are struck more often by such diseases as autoimmune conditions, oste...

By Anna Gorman and Jenny Gold California Healthline|

MOST RECENT STORIES

  • Marijuana

    Baldwin Park gives green light to commercial cultivation of recreational, medical marijuana

    BALDWIN PARK >> Commercial cultivation and the manufacture of marijuana — both medical and recreational — will be allowed in Baldwin Park, city leaders decided. At a special meeting Thursday, the City Council voted 4-1 to preliminarily approve an ordinance which allows that specific pot-related activity in the city’s industrial areas. The move — which must be reaffirmed with a second vote — reverses a 2015 decision banning cannabis...

    Stephanie K. Baer
    |

  • Poverty

    Texas cuts aid to ‘colonias’ after years of offering help

    ALAMO, Texas >> While the economy in Texas has boomed over the last 20 years, along the border with Mexico about a half million people live in clusters of cinderblock dwellings, home-built shacks, dilapidated trailers and small houses. Texas has more than 2,300 of these communities known as colonias, the Spanish word for “colony.” For decades, the villages have sprung up around cities as a home for poor Hispanic immigrant families. Some are shantytowns with neither...

    By Paul J. Weber Associated Press|

  • Ovarian cancer

    UCR researchers find way to thwart ovarian cancer, plan to work with City of Hope

    A pair of UC Riverside researchers say they have found a mechanism for blocking the spread of ovarian cancer, one of the deadliest cancers for women. Recent University of Notre Dame transplants Mark Alber and Oleg Kim, along with a team of researchers, published a study in Oncology Times in July that detailed how they used a monoclonal antibody named GC-4 to block a protein responsible for allowing ovarian cancer cells to latch onto and penetrate other cells. That’s how the...

    Mark Muckenfuss
    |

  • Public health

    California funds groups to serve food to Medi-Cal’s poor, just like medicine

    Federico Guzmán moved from Mexico to San Francisco in 1992, fleeing anti-gay sentiment and searching for AIDS treatment. He couldn’t find a job and sometimes went hungry until friends introduced him to Project Open Hand, a nonprofit organization that began serving free, nutritious meals to HIV patients in 1985. The people there “were like angels from the sky,” said Guzmán, 50, who went home from his first visit with vegetables, eggs, bread and...

    By Kellen Browning California Healthline|

  • HIV and AIDS

    Los Angeles gets biggest boost from HIV housing funds

    In a bipartisan push, Congress has restructured a federal housing program for HIV patients to funnel more money into areas struggling to control the spread of the virus. While legislators and housing advocates say the adjustments will better target regions with high rates of HIV, the changes are likely to mean less money for some of the large cities that faced the early effects of the epidemic. But California’s largest city, Los Angeles, will see its percentage of total program...

    By Carmen Heredia Rodriguez California Healthline|

  • Health care industry

    Paying doctors more — now will they treat more poor Californians?

    It seems like a simple solution. Raise what you pay doctors for treating low-income patients, and they’ll treat more of them. All those waits for appointments and physician shortages that have long plagued the state’s low-income health insurance program—a program that one out of every three Californians now relies on—could be remedied with a simple dose of economics. But in health care, nothing is that simple. Yes, while debate over the future...

    By Matt Levin CALmatters|

  • Teen pregnancy

    Teen pregnancy prevention programs at risk after Trump Administration budget cuts

    Luanne Rohrbach was stunned when she got the letter from Washington: The federal money for her teen pregnancy prevention program was being shut off. Rohrbach helps lead a program providing sexual health education for middle- and high-school students in Los Angeles and Compton. Called “Keeping It Real Together,” the initiative was supposed to reach 80,000 teens and their parents, as well as 55 schools, by 2020 in a community with a teen birth rate higher than the state...

    By Ana B. Ibarra and Kellen Browning California Healthline|

  • Health care services

    Leap of faith: Will healthcare ministries cover your costs?

    Martin Estacio was shelling out $800 per month for a health plan that didn’t fit his two-state lifestyle. The retired San Bernardino firefighter lives between Oklahoma and California. But his health insurance policy, purchased in Oklahoma, didn’t cover non-emergency care outside the state. So Estacio dropped his plan this month and took a leap of faith. He joined Christian Healthcare Ministries (CHM), an alternative to health insurance that offers a religious...

    By Emily Bazar Kaiser Health News|

  • News

    World War II vet logs more miles in Baldwin Park 5K

    BALDWIN PARK >> World War II veteran Lono Tyson has been running in the Baldwin Park Pride In The Valley 5K Run/Walk at Morgan Park since its inception in 1994. At age 90, he crossed the finish line again Saturday. Born and raised in Pasadena and a 60-year resident of Monrovia, Tyson said he used to complete the race running in about 16 minutes. These days, the course takes him about an hour. “I enjoy the challenge,” he said. “I’m...

    Sandra T. Molina
    |

  • Childhood immunizations

    Record high vaccination rates of 7th-graders reported in 1st year of stricter requirements

    Vaccination rates for California 7th-graders reached their highest recorded levels, the California Department of Public Health reported, in another sign that a stricter vaccination law is having an effect in its first year. The increase in 7th-grade immunizations follows previously released record-high levels of kindergarten vaccination rates. The new results end a year of speculation and angst in school districts about what parents opposed to vaccinations might do in the face of the...

    By Jane Meredith Adams EdSource|

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